Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States.

Traumatic Brain Injury contributes to about 30% of all deaths caused by injuries.

 

 

 

 

 Every day, 138 people in the United States die from injuries that include a TBI.  Those who survive a TBI can face effects lasting a few days to disabilities which may last the rest of their lives.  Effects of TBI can include impaired thinking or memory, movement, sensation (e.g., vision or hearing), or emotional functioning (e.g., personality changes, depression).  These issues not only affect individuals but can have lasting effects on families and loved ones. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States, contributing to about 30% of all injury deaths. In 2010, about 2.5 million emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, or deaths were associated with TBI—either alone or in combination with other injuries in the United States. 

 

 

 

 

    • TBI contributed to the deaths of more than 50,000 people.

    • TBI was a diagnosis in more than 280,000 hospitalizations and 2.2 million ED visits.  These consisted of TBI alone or TBI in combination with other injuries.

  • Over the past decade (2001–2010), while rates of TBI-related ED visits increased by 70%, hospitalization rates only increased by 11% and death rates decreased by 7%. 

  • In 2009, an estimated 248,418 children (age 19 or younger) were treated in U.S. EDs for sports and recreation-related injuries that included a diagnosis of concussion or TBI.3

    • From 2001 to 2009, the rate of ED visits for sports and recreation-related injuries with a diagnosis of concussion or TBI, alone or in combination with other injuries, rose 57% among children (age 19 or younger).

 

 

A TBI is an injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. It can be caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury (Marr and Coronado, 2004). Explosive blasts can also cause TBI, particularly among those who serve in the U.S. military. In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that TBIs accounted for approximately 2.5 million emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and deaths in the United States, either as an isolated injury or in combination with other injuries. Of these persons, approximately

87% (2,213,826) were treated in and released from EDs, another 11% (283,630) were hospitalized and discharged, and approximately 2% (52,844) died. However, these numbers underestimate the occurrence of TBIs. They do not account for those persons who did not receive medical care, had outpatient or office-based visits, or those who received care at a federal facility, such as persons serving in the U.S. military or those seeking care at a Veterans Affairs hospital (Faul et al., 2010). Those who serve in the U.S. military are at significant risk for TBI as Department of Defense data revealed that from 2000 through 2011 235,046 service members (or 4.2% of the 5,603,720 who served in the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps) were diagnosed with a TBI (CDC, NIH, DoD, and VA Leadership Panel, 2013). 

 

 

 

Source - The Report to Congress on Traumatic Brain Injury in the United States: Epidemiology and Rehabilitation is a publication of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

 

CDC CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION